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COGITATIO a print installation by Lauren Kirchner at Start Gallery Dallas http://startgallerydallas.com

COGITATIO (Thought) by Lauren Kirchner is comprised of a neuron-like motif, printed in red and blue oil-based ink on mirrored vinyl, and many blue and red elastic cords that extend from the edges of the print and attach to the gallery columns. The converging clusters of taut cords expand the neuron pattern into space, inviting the viewer to enter inside. The metallic quality of the vinyl creates a distorted, mirror-like effect.

This “printstallation” spans 8 ft in height and 22 ft in length, with elastic cords that extend into the gallery measuring 19 ft. This artwork was installed in sections throughout the week leading up to the opening of the show, and took a team of artists working with Lauren Kirchner approximately 10 hours to complete.

Thus, we present to you, the installation process.

COGITATIO a print installation by Lauren Kirchner at Start Gallery Dallas http://startgallerydallas.com

COGITATIO a print installation by Lauren Kirchner at Start Gallery Dallas http://startgallerydallas.com

COGITATIO a print installation by Lauren Kirchner at Start Gallery Dallas http://startgallerydallas.com

COGITATIO a print installation by Lauren Kirchner at Start Gallery Dallas http://startgallerydallas.com

Cutting out the shape with the aid of a projector.

COGITATIO a print installation by Lauren Kirchner at Start Gallery Dallas http://startgallerydallas.com

COGITATIO a print installation by Lauren Kirchner at Start Gallery Dallas http://startgallerydallas.com

Attaching the blue and red elastic cords to the wall around the edges of the installation.

COGITATIO a print installation by Lauren Kirchner at Start Gallery Dallas http://startgallerydallas.com

Lauren Kirchner pulling all the elastic bands together and attaching them to the gallery support beams.

COGITATIO a print installation by Lauren Kirchner at Start Gallery Dallas http://startgallerydallas.com

Views of the completed printstallation, COGITATIO. This work’s grand size and elaborate detail tie together the theme of IMAGO ANIMI, and are a testament to Kirchner’s skill and dedication. Congratulations, Lauren, on your MFA!

COGITATIO a print installation by Lauren Kirchner at Start Gallery Dallas http://startgallerydallas.com

COGITATIO a print installation by Lauren Kirchner at Start Gallery Dallas http://startgallerydallas.com

COGITATIO a print installation by Lauren Kirchner at Start Gallery Dallas http://startgallerydallas.com

Lauren Kirchner : IMAGO ANIMI

April 21 through June 2, 2012

Opening Reception: April 21, 5:30-8PM

Lauren Kirchner, Meditatione Animi I, 2012, ink on paper, 28 by 48 in. http://startgallerydallas.com

Lauren Kirchner, Meditatione Animi I, 2012, ink on paper, 28 by 48 in.

Start Gallery Dallas is pleased to present IMAGO ANIMI (Image of the Mind), an exhibition featuring large-scale prints and print installations by Lauren Kirchner, on display from April 21 through June 2, 2012, with an artist’s reception on April 21 from 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.

All that is human rests within our brain. This irreplaceable, yet enigmatic organ is not only responsible for our daily functions, but is also the home of our personality, emotions, and abilities. Out of roughly 85 billion neurons, only a small fraction is understood and mapped. Additionally, the brain creates new connections every second, defining us as individuals and connecting us to the greater scheme of humanity. Working from what is known about the human brain, Lauren Kirchner reconstructs and conceptualizes the patterns of neurons. Her lithographic prints form maps that interpret the images our most vital and enigmatic organ.

Kirchner’s printmaking techniques often derive from the way our brain functions. Just as neurons are created through the copying of parent cells, Kirchner produces prints in different colors and layers using the same matrix. She then flips and mirrors these layers to create a kaleidoscopic effect, resulting in depth and complexity within the print. For example, Meditatione Animi I consists of a seven run print on paper; a monoprint, lithographs, and a silkscreen. These layers are cut by hand into a shape resembling a brain scan. Rather than a sterile, digitized perfection, the image is interpreted artistically with the human hand, and is delightfully interrupted by asymmetries of cut and line.

The largest work in the series, COGITATIO (Thought) is presented as a site-specific installation, or “printstallation,” where the elements in the installation are made using printmaking processes. A neuron-like motif, printed on mirrored vinyl, is attached to the gallery wall. Cotton and polyester cords extend from the edges of the print and attach to the surrounding ceiling beams and columns. The converging clusters of taut cords mimic the neuron patterns seen throughout the exhibit, and expand the print in space, inviting the viewer to enter.

IMAGO ANIMI is Kirchner’s Master of Fine Arts exhibition, and is the culmination of a long artistic journey. Kirchner, who came from an undergraduate program that emphasized manual processes, struggled to thrive in a professional printing world dominated by digital methods. The seeming obsolescence of her printmaking skills caused her to question her purpose and direction. The works from CONTEXTUS, Kirchner’s Master of Arts show, exemplified her introspective period by melding square “pixel” forms with intricate lithographs, embroidery, and installation techniques, all painstakingly created by hand.

After working and studying with master printers around the United States, Kirchner has reached a new conclusion in her latest art works: that which separates humans from machines, and justifies our value, is the brain and its endless potential. Technology, for all its wonders, advances only as fast as human ability to create it. Thus, IMAGO ANIMI represents the triumph of the human mind and a synthesis of Kirchner’s artistic ideas.

Lauren Kirchner received her Bachelor of Fine Arts in Printmaking from Southern Illinois University Edwardsville in 2008. Following her graduation, she worked at the Chrysler Museum of Art in Norfolk, Virginia, Anchor Graphics in Chicago, Illinois, and the Anderson Ranch Art Center and Anderson Ranch Editions in Snowmass Village, Colorado. Kirchner moved to the DFW area to pursue further education at the University of Dallas, and received her Master of Arts in Printmaking in 2010. Start Gallery Dallas is proud to host Kirchner’s thesis for a Master of Fine Arts.

Start Gallery Dallas presents Lauren Kirchner : IMAGO ANIMI (Image of the Mind) http://startgallerydallas.com

Announcing our upcoming exhibit, which will feature large-scale print installations and print works by Lauren Kirchner. Stay tuned for further details!

And don’t forget to see Gerardo R. : Un Día a la Vez, open through April 15. Please e-mail us to make an appointment, and we’ll be happy to open the gallery for you!

We have some new photos of Start Gallery Dallas featuring Gerardo R. : Un Día a la Vez, on view now through April 15th.

Spring time is a major art season here in NYC and worldwide. While we were not able to attend all the art fairs last weekend (March 8-11), we had a chance to stop by the Fountain Art Fair NYC. This fair featured both American and international galleries, and showcased cutting-edge art from both the emerging and the established scenes. The atmosphere was laid-back and relaxed, and there were all media, styles of artwork, and galleries represented, such as screenprint publishers working with Montreal street artists.

Fountain Art Fair NYC 2012 Giant Peep

Here you see the giant Peep bunny. Also, while reviewing photos I love discovering people looking directly into my camera.

Fountain Art Fair NYC Spring 2012

Fountain Art Fair NYC Spring 2012

Fountain Art Fair NYC Spring 2012

Memes have made their way into the art world.

Fountain Art Fair NYC Spring 2012

A Japanese artist with Ginza Gallery G2.

Fountain Art Fair NYC Spring 2012

Robert speaking to another Japanese artist with Gallery Den. His name is SEISUI and he makes Noh Masks.

Fountain Art Fair NYC Spring 2012

A sculpture that is both menacing and well lit.

Fountain Art Fair NYC Spring 2012

Needless to say we had a lot to go through from the art fair.

Thanks for taking a look!

Un Dia a la Vez at Start Gallery Dallas http://startgallerydallas.com

Start Gallery Dallas presents Gerardo R. : Un Día a la Vez (One Day at a Time)

Opening Reception: Saturday, March 3, 5:30-8pm

1004 W Page Ave, Dallas, TX 75208

The gallery is all ready for visitors for the opening reception tomorrow night. Come by and see Gerardo R. : Un Día a la Vez, a series of large scale, mixed-media paintings and drawings exploring the subject of the Mexican Drug Wars. Hope to see you there!

Gerardo R., Coca Cola Mexicana, 2011, oil and stucco on canvas, 48 by 78 in at Start Gallery Dallas

Gerardo R., Coca Cola Mexicana, 2011, oil and stucco on canvas, 48 by 78 in

Start Gallery Dallas presents Gerardo R. :Un Día a la Vez (One Day at a Time) http://stargallerydallas.com

We are pleased to announce our first exhibit of 2012! Gerardo R. comes to Start Gallery Dallas in his debut show of paintings and drawings, Un Día a la Vez (One Day at a Time). More details to follow!

Maurizio Cattelan: All at Guggenheim Museum

Maurizio Cattelan: All at Guggenheim Museum

Maurizio Cattelan: All is a retrospective exhibit held by the Guggenheim Museum featuring all the artworks created by the artist since 1989. Maurizio Cattelan, an Italian-born contemporary artist, is known for his often satirical, hyper-realistic, and humorous sculptures. Drawing from his childhood, economic struggles, and experiences growing up in the often volatile political atmosphere of Italy, Cattelan utilizes taxidermy, his own figure, and cultural icons such as John F. Kennedy and Pope John Paul II to present his thesis on society, culture, and mortality.

Maurizio Cattelan: All at Guggenheim Museum

Maurizio Cattelan, Novecento, 1997. Maurizio Cattelan: All at Guggenheim Museum

The museum visitor engages with the artworks as they hang suspended by rope from the oculus in the rotunda of the Guggenheim. As one walks in a circular path leading to the top of the museum, the viewer is able to view each artwork individually. The exhibition comes with a clever map where each work is numbered corresponding to its name and further information.

Maurizio Cattelan: All at Guggenheim Museum

Maurizio Cattelan, La Nona Ora, 1999. Maurizio Cattelan: All at Guggenheim Museum.

Above: “The Ninth Hour,” a sculpture featuring the effigy of Pope John Paul II being struck down by a meteor.

Maurizio Cattelan: All at Guggenheim Museum

Maurizio Cattelan, Untitled, 2001. Maurizio Cattelan: All at Guggenheim Museum

The above untitled work is a site installation created for the Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen in Rotterdam. Cattelan is looking through a hole in the floor at a gallery featuring Old Master paintings. You can see it here in its intended context.

Maurizio Cattelan: All at Guggenheim Museum

Maurizio Cattelan, Untitled, 2007. Maurizio Cattelan: All at Guggenheim Museum.

Maurizio Cattelan: All at Guggenheim Museum

Maurizio Cattelan, La Rivoluzione siamo noi, 2000. Maurizio Cattelan: All at Guggenheim Museum

“We are the revolution.”

Maurizio Cattelan: All at Guggenheim Museum

Maurizio Cattelan, Now, 2004. Maurizio Cattelan: All at Guggenheim Museum.

Maurizio Cattelan: All at Guggenheim Museum

Maurizio Cattelan, All, 2007. Maurizio Cattelan: All at Guggenheim Museum

This draped figure is one of nine sculptures in the series All.

Maurizio Cattelan: All at Guggenheim Museum

Maurizio Cattelan, Untitled, 2001. Maurizio Cattelan: All at Guggenheim Museum.

A motorized, working mini elevator.

Maurizio Cattelan: All at Guggenheim Museum

Maurizio Cattelan, Love Saves Life, 1995. Maurizio Cattelan: All at Guggenheim Museum.

Maurizio Cattelan: All at Guggenheim Museum

Maurizio Cattelan, Love Lasts Forever, 1997. Maurizio Cattelan: All at Guggenheim Museum.

Maurizio Cattelan: All at Guggenheim Museum

Maurizio Cattelan, Betsy, 2002. Maurizio Cattelan: All at Guggenheim Museum.

This exhibit is a symphony of the hyper-realistic, grotesque, oftentimes poignant, as well as humorous art works. The way they are suspended from the museum rotunda gives the audience an understanding of an artist whose art career holds grandiosity and cultural significance. When we encounter an especially cheeky artwork, we can’t help but chuckle, and that provides a form of comic relief from the artworks that are more serious in nature.

Cattelan’s art evokes emotions, changes our minds, and shifts our perspective—as all good art should. This exhibit is running through January 22, 2012. If you find yourself in NYC before then, I highly recommend that you visit the Guggenheim!

A Thought On Art

December 12, 2011

"The object created - whether it be a painting, a melody, or a sentence - is a mirror that reflects back to us the feeling or the thought we had within us, and allows us to scrutinize and evaluate it more carefully than we could before. And it may well be that we then disapprove of that aspect of ourself which the mirror exhibits to us. In such a case, we may reject the work we have created, not because it expresses inadequately what we had to express, but because what it does adequately express is something that indeed was, but is no longer, a part of ourself. We have transcended, and now disown, the feeling the work objectifies." - Curt Ducasse. From Art, the Critics, and You

I’ve always been fond of the thoughts expressed in this particular excerpt by the philosopher Curt Ducasse, taken from his book Art, the Critics, and You.

Artists, writers, and musicians- what do you think about this excerpt?

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